In the course of creating my own website, I have looked at several websites for composers at all levels and points in their career. The importance of a good web presence for a composer cannot be understated. It will often be the first and main portal to a composer for performers or potential listeners.

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After a fairly good run of performances, I have been stuck in a lull due to the time commitment required for my Computer Science degree (a math degree, in essence). Very quickly I realized that, unless you are famous, getting performances for my music requires constant pursuit. Along with that, composing is just like playing an instrument: without constant practice it can be very difficult to get back into a groove. In the past I would compose pieces specifically for competitions or calls for scores. As a result, I have a bunch of music with odd instrumental combinations that will never be performed.

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In the article “Creative AI: Computer composers are changing how music is made” by Richard Moss, current trends in music composed by computer programs is examined. Artificial Intelligence is an area of research in Computer Science that deals with creating computer programs that imitate (to some degree) the human mind’s learning process. Moss presents several examples of different kinds of computer music composition including: programs that are able to mimic a specific composer’s style (Well Programmed Clavier by David Cope), those based on biology (Iamus), and even one that automatically composes music for video games based on the live situation in the game itself (Mezzo). Many people wonder if A.I. composition can truly be creative, and if it is, can it put living composers out of work? On the latter, I don’t believe that A.I. composition will likely be able to supplant actual human composers. The question of a computer program’s capacity for creativity, however, is a much more complicated and subjective problem to address.

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